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South Africa: Scuba Diving Destinations

Protea banks

Protea Banks is suited to advanced divers who are looking for big animals! It has gained a reputation as one of the world’s top shark dives with Zambezi (Bull Shark), Tiger, Hammerhead, Blacktip, Ragged-Tooth, Bronze Whaler and if you are lucky the Great White.

Aliwal

Aliwal Shoal is a stretch of reef that is roughly 3km in length and approximately 1km wide at its widest point.  The reef has an abundance of fish life and corals, both soft and hard. The real beauty is only really appreciated once it has been dived.  Aliwal Shoal offers some of the most exciting diving in the world. Dive with Ragged Tooth Sharks, Tiger Sharks and Manta Rays, Dolphins and Whale Sharks.

Sodwana

Sodwana Bay is considered to be among the premier dive sites of the world, it is home to the southern most tropical coral reefs on the planet which are further south than the Great Barrier Reef. The reef has an incredibly dense coral cover and wide diversity of fish, crustaceans and more with over 1200 species having been recorded in the area.
Conditions range from idyllic to challenging depending on the wind and the current. The sites vary in depth between 10 meters and depths only suited to technical deep divers.
The bio diversity in the area is phenomenal from the big to small. Seasonal visitors include humpback whales and manta rays, others such as dolphins, turtles and whales sharks appear year round. Some of the small “jewellery” on offer includes paperfish, pipefish, seahorses, nudibranchs, frog fish and a host of many others.

Rocktail

Rocktail Bay, hidden away along Maputaland’s beautiful coastline, offers perhaps the most unspoilt beach experience in South Africa, where endless white beaches invite you to play, relax and enjoy superlative dive spots and reef systems boasting healthy coral life. These reefs only opened up to scuba divers a few years ago. The coral is in magnificent condition and, as for the fish, over 1,250 species have been recorded – a number that’s comparable to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.